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Daniel Maddock, Independent Financial Adviser

Daniel Maddock
Daniel Maddock DipFA

I started my career in financial services at Friends Provident in Exeter, helping clients and financial advisers with their pensions on the New Generation Pensions team. It was extremely insightful and an enjoyable place to work, I left in 2009 and started my own practice in 2011 as a non-investment financial adviser. In 2014 I completed all the regulatory exams to provide investment advice and haven’t looked back since!

Investment advice, especially within pensions, is my passion and constructing bespoke investment portfolios that enable clients to enjoy retirement gives me real job satisfaction.

I’m currently studying Discretionary Investment Management as part of my continued professional development and hope this will help add another dimension of success to our already successful bespoke portfolios.

I enjoy visiting clients all over Devon and particularly in Plymouth where I grew up, although it is nice to travel further afield as and when required.

Time away from the office is enjoyed with family, friends and triathlon related activities.

Qualifications:

  • Diploma in Financial Planning (DipFA)
  • Certificate in Mortgage advice (Certs CII MP)
  • Certificate in Equity Release (Certs CII ER)
  • Certificate in Regulated General Insurance (CeRGI)

Chloe Illman DipPFS

Chloe Illman DipPFS
Chloe Illman DipPFS

Having worked in Financial Services since 2008 and obtaining the Diploma in Regulated Financial Planning and Certificate in Discretionary Investment Management, I have spent the last 5 years helping clients with every aspect of their financial planning. This includes areas such as inheritance tax mitigation, bespoke investment portfolio construction and complex retirement planning.

My particular area of interest is helping my clients construct and work through their own unique retirement journey. It is an amazing privilege to help build a picture of what they want their retirement to look like and then helping them to achieve these goals, supplying peace of mind and support every step of the way.

Despite retirement planning being my specialist area, my client base is very diverse. I have clients of all ages and goals when it comes to what they personally want and need from a financial adviser. I pride myself in the fact that I tailor my advice to suit the individual I am working with, ensuring their own needs are always at the heart of any recommendations I give. It is important to me that my clients feel a part of the planning journey, whilst being able to share the burden of their financial affairs with a trusted professional.

I feel very privileged to have won the Chartered Insurance Institutes (CII’s) ‘Young Professional of the Year’ award in 2019 for my dedication to the profession and continual professional development. I hope this shows my clients my devotion to the profession and that I am part of a new generation of highly qualified and dynamic professionals coming up the ranks.

In my spare time I enjoy spending time with my partner, cooking (and eating said food), walking in the Blackdown Hills where I am lucky enough to live, and just generally trying to enjoy all the simple pleasures that life has to offer.

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Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

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